AMM 7400 Weekender Boat Test

AMM 7400 Weekender Boat Test

Australian Master Marine have created what Rick Huckstepp calls “a very serious Sportfishing platform”. They call it the Weekender, but Rick considers it an all rounder!

AMM 7400 Boat Test

Boat Test AMM 7400 Weekender : LOOK FORWARD TO THE WEEKENDER
Author and photography: Rick Huckstepp

This boat test ran in ISSUE 77 of BlueWater magazine – FEB-MARCH 2010 

For the complete feature, including all photos and information captions, you can purchase back-issues here

The Australian Master Marine 7400 Weekender probably should have been called an ‘all-rounder’, as it is well suited to many roles. Over the past few years this model has evolved into a very serious sportfishing platform.

The earlier models featured an 18-degree deadrise, but this is now set at 20 degrees, which adds to stability when off the plane. Additionally, the chines have been expanded to 18cm in width, which greatly reduces any rock and roll when on the drift or at anchor. AMM have also changed the height of the gunwales, raising them by 30mm. This makes quite a difference when the knees are tucked under and you are locked down on a big fish.

Other changes are not so easily seen. One of these is the fuel storage system below deck, which is built to survey requirements. The fuel tank sits within another ‘tank’ so that any fuel leaks are contained and then drained outboard via a separate vent rather than finding their way into the bilge.

The working cockpit is larger than its predecessor thanks to changes in the live bait tank location. The Weekender now has a flat fascia across the transom bulkhead, with the livebait tank tucked into the starboard corner for easier access. Workspace is further maximised in the cockpit by modified coamings.

The bow has a good-sized anchor well installed; open to the elements and large enough to handle some of the currently popular drum winches. If you want to handle the ground tackle from the cabin roof hatch you will find it is a long reach forward, but not impossible.

Having such high free board means difficulty of access, so the full height transom entry door, on the port side, is most welcome. You’ll also appreciate it when dragging a heavy fish aboard.

In the cabin two people could grab a nap between hot strikes and a portable toilet can be fitted behind a pull out gate. There is adequate under-bunk stowage, with further stowage available in the two seat modules at the helm. The aft end of the port side module has been turned into an icebox and will be handy for frozen baits and day trip refreshments.

The cockpit side pockets are long and wide, fitted high enough off the deck for feet to gain a bracing. A catch tank is fitted aft in the central deck and another hatch forward opens to the bilge, suitable for fenders and other wet gear.

A dash for modern equipment

Large screen electronics have become more common recently, not only for large trailer boats. Many smaller craft operators have cottoned-on to the fact that in this day and age, where split screen combination units are an option, viewing screens need to be big enough to view the chart plotter as well as the depth sounder. So big is better. These large units can be flush mounted in a high and wide brow at the helm in the 7400. The rest of the flat top dash will hold plenty of charts and other items, though a rear rail would be a nice addition to stop gear slipping off when underway at speed.

In keeping with the weekender theme, where family toys and even rubber inflatables for going ashore are required, the hard top of the Weekender has been kept relatively clutter free. Some of these distractions to fishing may be tied down up there for transport. It is supported on a framework rather than side walls and the gap between it and the windscreen may be filled with clears; a practical style for a boat intended for the mid to northern tropics.

Performance

Underway the 7400 has got some real legs with WOT of 6000rpm getting us to 80kmh on unfortunately flat water. The pair of 150hp Yamaha four strokes showed good fuel figures at a cruise of 45kmh, which has them ticking over at 3500rpm for consumption on both motors combined of 38lph. If you want to back off to ‘just on the plane’at 2200rpm and 17kmh, the Yamahas are sipping just 17lph. And since I’ve often run these hulls in rough South Australian seas, believe me when I say that these boats will hack the pace and go the distance strength wise.

With counter rotating propellers you can get the stern around quickly when in the final stages of fighting a big fish. Manoeuvrability at speed and hole shot is as good as it is going to get in a boat of this size.

If it is plate you are chasing, this one should be on the ‘must see’ list. It’s much more than a weekender.

Capacities

  • Fuel: 2 x 240 litres
  • Water: 50 litres
  • People berthed: 2
  • People day: 8 to 600kg
  • Max.rec/hp: 350
  • Min.rec/hp: 200
  • Max.transom engine weight: 440kg
  • Max.load-engine/people/luggage: 1160kg

General

  • Material: Plate alloy 6mm bottom and 4mm sides
  • Length overall: 7.7m with bowsprit (300mm)
  • Length on trailer: 9.5m
  • Beam: 2.5m
  • Deadrise: 20-degrees, variable to the bow
  • Weight: 2800kg with 480l fuel and 50l water

Engines

  • Make and model: Yamaha F150AET x 2
  • Type: EFI 4-cylinder, 4-stroke
  • Rated hp: 150
  • Displacement: 2670cc
  • Gearbox ratio: 14:28 (2.0)
  • Weight: 220kg
  • Propellers: counter rotating 25-inch
AMM 7400 Boat Test

Boat Test AMM 7400 Weekender : LOOK FORWARD TO THE WEEKENDER
Author and photography: Rick Huckstepp
Supplied by: Australian Master Marine

This boat test ran in ISSUE 77 of BlueWater magazine –  FEB-MARCH 2010 

For the complete feature, including all photos and information captions, you can purchase back-issues here